Spring 2019: time to count

Spring Wild Pollinator Count starts now, Sunday 10 November.

You can do as many 10-minute counts as you want, anywhere in Australia, until Sunday 17 November 2019. Submit your observations via our submission form. We will keep the form open for the following week to allow everyone time to get their submissions in.

Enjoy some time out with nature this week and be surprised at what you find!

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Nearly time for Spring 2019 Wild Pollinator Count

Our spring Wild Pollinator Count starts this Sunday November 10 and runs until the following Sunday 17 November.

Remember, your 10 minute count must be done during the count week, but the submission form will remain open the following week for you to get all your observations submitted. And you can do as many counts as you want during the count week!

We’re currently in the worst drought on record here in the New England region (and much of eastern Australia). The spring flowers in my garden are mostly dandelions. But there are still quite a few wild pollinators around if I look hard, including lots of beeflies, hylaeine bees, caper white butterflies, and some cute colletid bees I found roosting on our dying cherry tree. Fingers crossed for rain soon! Continue reading “Nearly time for Spring 2019 Wild Pollinator Count”

More ways to share your insect observations with Wild Pollinator Count

The Wild Pollinator Count is on again this spring from 10 to 17 November across Australia.

We invite you to spend ten minutes watching a flowering plant and let us know the insects you see visiting, using our simple reporting categories. You can conduct one count or many during the week, on the same plant or different plants, in your garden or elsewhere. Simply enter your totals for each count via our online form. The spring count will be our 11th event collecting data about the insects observed across Australia during the two count periods each year. We hope you’ll join in!

Additional ways to contribute pollinator insect observations

If you’d like to take a step beyond our simple count methods, please also consider joining our Wild Pollinator Count project on iNaturalist.

We know the timing of our count periods doesn’t suit everyone, every insect nor every plant (but it does provide a point of comparison across the years and seasons!). Many participants in our counts take photos of the insects they see and are keen to have them identified. Participants often include additional details about their sightings and many have great identification knowledge. Through iNaturalist we’re offering additional ways to contribute your observations and knowledge, including outside our count periods.

What is iNaturalist?

iNaturalist a tool for submitting nature observations either via an app or website. You might think of it as a social network for nature spotters. You can submit records that others can see; seek confirmation or assistance with the identity of the species you saw; join projects and follow people, places or species!

There are many apps and platforms for sharing nature records. Some are for specific groups (like eBird and FrogID) while iNaturalist enables records of any wild organism, from animals to plants to fungi and more.

Why add my photo to the Wild Pollinator Count project on iNaturalist?

When adding your record to our project, you’ll be prompted to answer some additional questions about your observation, including the name of the plant you were observing and whether your observation was during a ten-minute survey in our count period. The project also makes it easier for our team to access photos (in one location rather than across emails and social media) and allows others on iNaturalist to contribute to the identifications. Records from iNaturalist that meet certain criteria are automatically shared to the Atlas of Living Australia – the national biodiversity database.

iNaturalist has lots of information and guides to help get you started. We’ve also added this page as a starting point for joining and using our Wild Pollinator Count iNaturalist project.

Should I still complete a ten-minute count during the Wild Pollinator Count week?

Yes, please! We’re using iNaturalist to extend the ways you can contribute observations of pollinator insects. We are still focused on comparing results for our nominated count weeks each spring and autumn and we’d love your help to do that.

The instructions for how to count, tips for identifying the insects you see into our count categories and submission form are all available on our website.

With two weeks until the official start of the spring Wild Pollinator Count, we hope you’ll join in – whether by completing a ten-minute count, by adding your sightings to our iNaturalist project, or perhaps both!

 

Comparison of ways to contribute to the Wild Pollinator Count

Table comparing Wild Pollinator Count 10 minute surveys and iNaturalist records

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Springtime Count 2018

It’s almost time for our Spring 2018 Wild Pollinator Count! This year, the count will run 11-18 November. Connect with us on social media with the official hashtag #OzPollinators.

It’s really easy to join in, wherever you are in Australia – just pick a warm, sunny day during the official count week, find a flower to watch for 10 minutes, and then submit your observations via our online form. Just follow the instructions on the How to Count page. As usual, the form will stay open for one week after the 18th, to allow you time to get your observations in.

The sprinter weather here in Armidale hasn’t been ideal for pollinator spotting so far. But there have been plenty of fly pollinators active on all the early-spring flowering plants. I’m looking forward to seeing what insects are out and about visiting flowers in a few weeks.

Here are some handy tips for how to tell the difference between bees, flies and wasps visiting flowers. And don’t forget you can download our Pollinator Guide here, as well as plenty of other resources and answers to some FAQ.

Happy Spring Counting…And if you miss out this time, we’ll be counting again in April 2019!

If you’re new to Wild Pollinator Count, we are an independent project run by scientists focused on pollinator conservation in Australia – find out more about us here.

Nov18 WPC tag